The Full Guide to Creating an Alexa Skill with Flask-Ask

I’ve written several skills using the Flask-Ask framework but found Amazon’s basic tutorial to only work for short-term projects that would not be officially published. Recently, I wrote a post here about the environment I created to be a fast and reliable host for my published skills, specifically Explain Like I’m Five. That post explains the components and my reasons for using them. This is the technical guide to setting up that environment.

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My Alexa Skills Environment

I first became interested in the Alexa Skills Kit when I got a strip of LED lights for Christmas. Python is my go to language so I used the Flask-Ask framework on a Raspberry Pi to make them change colors, flash, etc. with my voice. The code was very basic, and the networking with ngrok was messy. The endpoint domain had to be changed in the skill’s configuration every time ngrok was stopped or my Raspberry Pi restarted.

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Install and Configure OpenVPN Access Server

A while ago I wrote an introduction to virtual private networks. I have an odd love for this technology and the wide array of uses that come with implementing it. What used to be a tool for enterprise use is now almost a commonly known term. Just this evening, NPR ran a story about normal people using VPNs to deter spying by internet providers and the government. They recommend the safest way to use a VPN is to host it yourself. Today it is easier than ever to configure a quality VPN server.

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Log File To Google Map with Python

Opening up a computer to the world exposes it to a plethora of bots scanning for default credentials, unpatched vulnerabilities, among other things. It’s important to take this into consideration when configuring a publicly facing service. Key exchange or a strong password, access control, and keeping on top of updates are a must. When I first got to campus which has a mostly public facing network, I was amazed at the number of bots constantly scanning everything and anything.

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Breaking into Windows with Sticky Keys

The good ol’ sticky keys exploit. As a security centric IT intern, I was elected to break into the old machine an employee had forgotten the password to. The machine ran XP - easy. This exploit works on at least XP and Windows 7. The only thing required is a bootable Linux live USB and a handful of Linux and Windows commands. If all goes smoothly, you can expect to be back in the machine in roughly 5 minutes. #What The sticky keys prompt is titled ‘sethc.exe’. This application is called by name when shift is pressed 5 times. By changing the contents of this executable, we can run whatever code we want at system level. Since this hotkey is listening even before login, it’s very useful for resetting a lost password. By changing the command prompt’s name to sethc.exe, we gain a system level shell which can manage users.

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